Cover to Cover #217: J. C. Hutchins

Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Google+0Share on Facebook0Share on StumbleUpon0

Show Notes
7th Son, by J. C. Hutchins.

On the show this week the guys interview J. C. Hutchins, author of 7th Son. This podiobook tells the story of clones - unaware of being clones - all coming together to aide in the capture of the original genetic code donor. Talk about a twisted story that will make your head swim. Don't miss it.

Also on the Show:

  • Michael and Evo have two conventions to attend, so this week's show will be shorter than most.

  • The Nebula Awards are in Phoenix, find out about some of the books up for an award and the authors that will be attending.
  • Leprecon is the other convention happening in Phoenix, and impacting the normal recording schedule.
  • No library segment this week, but Evo tells us about a couple books you should know about.
About Summer Brooks

Summer Brooks is an avid fan of stories and story-telling, and fell in love with genre fiction at an early age. She's published several items, is currently working on several novels and webcomics, and one goal of hers is to write stories for television that leave a mark on people.

Summer is also the Executive Producer for FarPoint Media, and juggling all those shows and websites also keeps her pretty busy.

Comments

  1. Maureen says:

    I really enjoyed this week's show. I'm a huge fan of 7th Son and must confess to being one of those who wrote to J.C. Hutchins as soon as I listened to a couple of the episodes. As I told him, I really wish that his books were available in print or downloadable e-book form. I'd buy them in a heartbeat. I think that is may be the best podio book that I've heard.

    I was also happy to hear His Majesty's Dragon mentioned. I think it would be great if you interviewed Naomi Novik. I really liked this book. I agree with Evo that some of its appeal is that it isn't about a group of outsiders who have to slog across mountains in the mud to prevent The End of the World. What I liked most about it was the internal consistency of the world that she writes in. My impression is that it takes place right around the reign of George III, who was the grandfather of Victoria, during the Napoleaonic Wars. She tweaks reality in that dragons exist and are used for their flying and fighting capability. The majority of the culture sees them as little more than military draught animals. Within the framework of her story, they are much more than that. I believe, in the end, that this conflict, of what the dragons are perceived to be and to be capable of and what they are and are capable of, will prove to be the core of the three books. "What is the role of duty?" and "Where does duty lie?" are key qustions.

    This book is part of a trilogy that is being released within the space of two months. Throne of Jade, the second book in the trilogy is already available, having been released during the end of April. Black Powder War, the third book, will be released on May 30.

    I would recommend them both to people who are fans of books about dragons and to those who like naval military series like the Horatio Hornblower books.

  2. We are always looking for guests to talk to. I'm sure we will do our best to get Naomi on soon.

    Keep an eye on the website.

  3. The coolest thing about J.C.'s 7th Son is the way he reads it. He really throws a lot of enthusiasm and passion into it. You can tell he's really into his story and his characters-that's what makes it pop and come alive. To top it of he's also done an excellent audio production job. Succinctly, I'm sending some of my clones to have him killed due to total jealousy. I mean even his name, is like one of those cool NASCAR drivers' names.

  4. Brian Bertrand says:

    Just want to say guys, that I read Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell and I really do not agree with your take that this is another 'Harry Potteresque kids book'. This book is written in a more formal style and I doubt would click with a child-audience as much because it is not nearly as action packed and does not have characters that children would necessarily connect with. In fact one of the title characters does not show up for nearly a quarter of the novel. In spite of this I found it to be an enjoyable read and the ending had a significant twist to it that definitely caught me flat footed

  5. Boy I got to this episode late this week..... Anyhoo, I started listening to 7th son about a month ago after listening to a promo for it on Ancester. Scott Sigler was raving about it so I thought well I better listen to this. i agree its awesome, I was curious about it being Book 1 and am glad to hear that I have a triology to look forward to.

    I agree by the way with what you were talking about in the beginning how most of the books up for Nebulas you did not receive.You guys interview all these amazing authors, you have a huge audience that listens to you, why are you not getting all these books sent to you? Although as busy as you are all now, do you really want more books?

    Thanks for another awesome show Dragon Page

  6. To start the show this week, y'all talked about the Hugo and Nebula awards and how you hadn't had a chance to read as many of the books.

    I've noticed a trend, esp. in the Hugos, that once an author gets nominated, his or her stuff seems to jump up there every year. And if he or she wins, there seems to be a trend of nominations. For example, Lois McMaster Bujold has been nominated and won multiple times for her Miles Verokosigan series (which is good and a personal favorite, don't get me wrong). But I often wonder if these types of awards are somewhat name recongition, simliar to the the Emmys on TV. The hardest part is to breakthrough and get that first nod. After that, it's a bit easier to get a nomination becuase you have the name recongition.

    Of course, I will argue the novels that Asimov won his Hugo for were more a lifetime achievement award than actually rewarding his books for being the best that year. I think it was the Gods Themselves in the 70s that came out after a long period of no new Asimov and I think everyone was so excited about it that they gave it the award because it was new Asimov and not that it was necessarily the greatest novel.

Speak Your Mind

*